Classic Styles to Spark Your Handbag Obsession

With new styles appearing every decade, it’s almost impossible to list every type of handbag available on the market today. However, that didn’t stop us from giving this topic a go! Read on to learn about our 15 favourite handbag styles and the fashions that inspired their creation.

Baguette

The baguette bag is a staple of any fashion-lover’s wardrobe. It’s small, compact, and is named after its resemblance to a French loaf of bread! Perfect for keeping your everyday necessities in, it can be made from near enough any fabric but is usually styled in leather (or faux leather) with a short strap.

Fendi first designed the baguette bag in 1997, and since Carrie Bradshaw made it a core accessory to many of her looks in Sex and the City, it’s been seen tucked under the shoulder of countless celebs.

Credit: HBO

The original ‘It bag’ fan club includes the likes of Emma Roberts, Amanda Seyfried and Rihanna (who, along with Sarah Jessica Parker and three other modern style icons, designed her very own re-make of the classic silhouette in 2015).

Barrel

If you’re looking for something a little more practical, the barrel bag is the perfect travel accessory for both men and women. Also known as a duffel bag, this “closed tube” style was originally designed for military use but remains popular to this day.

This spacious silhouette is generally made of soft fabrics such as canvas and is the ultimate in versatility: it’s available in a variety of sizes and you can carry it with handles or a shoulder strap depending on the occasion (or how heavy your luggage is!)

Bowling Bag

Another functional favourite, the bowling bag purse is an accessory which has been a part of the handbag fashion scene since the 1920s, where it was first created in response to the increased popularity of bowling as a sport among young people. The bowling bag saw a resurgence in the ‘50s, where players sported matching leather bags and outfits in their team colours, and since then has seen repeat popularity as a ‘retro accessory’ all the way from the ‘90s to modern iterations, such as this Prada bowling bag which has been updated for 2020 to celebrate 20 years since its initial release:

Credit: Prada

Bucket

Just like baguette and barrel bags, the bucket bag looks just like its namesake – but a lot classier! These round bags are reasonably large and are absolutely perfect for holding taller and more bulky items such as bottles (in fact, that was what it was designed for.) All your essentials are tucked in safely in position with a drawstring closure and usually a reinforced bottom panel – slip it over your shoulder or choose a shorter strap – your choice!

We love bucket bags so much, we even made our very own:

Sugar Buxx, Fricaine

This gorgeous number features a custom jacquard pattern and all the storage space you’ll ever need for a day out with the girls.

Clutch

Two words: absolute classic. The clutch bag will take you from your brunch date in the morning all the way to the club. Found either with a thin, detachable metal strap, a loop to keep it safe, or usually no strap at all (it’s meant to be clutched, right?) there really is no limit to the fabric, style, pattern, or even shape of these handbags.

For a beautifully unique clutch that’s perfect for storing your essentials on a day-to-day basis, why not check out our exclusive range?

Doctor’s Bag

For as long as there have been doctors, there have been doctor’s bags. Also known as a Gladstone bag, these traditionally unisex leather handbags are highly durable and generally quite boxy, perfect for use while travelling. Whether you’re a doctor or just a commuter who needs easy access to all your everyday tools, this bag is perfect for you – with an assortment of pockets, compartments and zippers, the modern doctor’s bag is ideal for the organised fashionista.

Drawstring

There are two main types of drawstring bag: a smaller model for carrying on your wrist, highly reminiscent of the ‘indispensable’ or ‘reticule’ bag which we’ll discuss later in this list, or alternatively the modern ‘gym bag’ which is more akin to a backpack. The perfect treasure trove for safely securing all your possessions on a day out, or for your evening essentials, the drawstring bag is an inexpensive and lightweight choice that is only ever as big as its contents, so can be easily stored or tucked away when not in use.

Half-moon

Once again, the clue’s in the name! Often seen in smooth leather with an envelope-style clasp or popper, this understated yet stylish accessory is the perfect everyday purse and goes with pretty much everything. Fashion queen Victoria Beckham even has her very own range, in case you needed any more convincing:

Credit: XposurePhotos

Hobo

The hobo bag is characterized by its crescent shape, and is usually made of a soft material which gives it its signature ‘slouch’ when set down. Although the bag’s style and name originate from an archaic and somewhat derogatory reference to the sack usually carried on a stick by travelling hobos in the 1800s, its increased popularity within fashion spheres has given the hobo bag an identity of its own. Check out this one that’s perfect for adding a splash of color to your outfit.

Kiondo

This highly durable bag is indigenous to Kenya, painstakingly handwoven from individual sisal threads with leather trimmings and straps.

Source: mifuko.fi

These traditional bags are used throughout Africa for carrying shopping, storing goods and giving as gifts at weddings. In the western world, kiondo or similar woven bags are a perfect summertime accessory for taking to the beach (and of course, for shopping too!)

Messenger Bag

Originally designed in the mid-20th century for delivering mail (hence the name), messenger bags are generally made from a soft cloth-like material and have a long diagonal strap so they can easily be slung over your shoulder – perfect for cyclists! Due to its rectangular shape, the messenger bag is ideal for carrying documents and is often seen among students and commuters alike.

Minaudière

Technically a type of clutch bag, the minaudière is a small, hard-bodied handbag which is more suited to formal or evening occasions than the traditional clutch. They are usually decorated with intricate jewels or beading and are often shiny or sparkly – with one of these, you’ll be sure to turn heads wherever you go.

The minaudière has even been spotted in the hands of royalty. An example is this beautiful gold zodiac clutch bag by Naeem Khan that Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle wore to the Queen’s birthday in 2018:

Reticule

The precursor to the modern drawstring bag, the reticule (or ‘indispensable’ in English) has been around since the 18th century and is usually a soft silk or velvet bag that can be worn on the wrist – find out more in our History of Handbags blog post.

Satchel

The satchel bag is similar in a lot of ways to the messenger bag we mentioned earlier. However, whereas messenger bags are usually crafted from soft cloth or canvas, satchels are essentially a more relaxed briefcase and made of soft leather.

Fancy something a little more exciting than plain leather? We offer a variety of satchel bags for the sophisticated woman that feature carefully-embroidered designs, such as this classy Treasure handbag that’s the perfect statement piece:

Treasure (Black) Embroidered Satchel, Fricaine

Wear it like a satchel with the easily-adjustable strap, or carry it comfortably wherever you go with its durable leather handles.

Tote

Possibly the most diverse handbag around, the tote can be found everywhere from the supermarket as an eco-friendly alternative to plastic bags (did you know it was originally designed for carrying ice?) all the way to the catwalk, and under the arms of pretty much every celebrity around. With a flat surface and two handles for carrying either by your side or under the shoulder, the tote bag has endless customizability options and can be used to display your personal style.

If, like us, you’re keen to flash some exotic patterns while you’re getting your groceries, boy have we got the bag for you – just check out our embroidered range of totes. The best thing about totes is how roomy they are, and with extra pockets for safely storing your phone, cards and keys, all you’ll have to worry about is how you’re going to find enough things to fill it up!

Interesting articles read while researching this blog:

https://www.aspinaloflondon.com/discover-aspinal/aspinal-news/the-story-behind-the-bowling-bag

https://euce.com/know-your-bags-cambridge-satchel-vs-messenger-bags https://medium.com/@tony.unbelievabletrip/what-is-the-difference-between-a-hobo-tote-and-satchel-a8d9ca97b609 https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/13/t-magazine/fendi-baguette-rihanna-sarah-jessica-parker.html

https://www.papermag.com/prada-bowling-bowl-2636234560.html?rebelltitem=9#rebelltitem9

https://www.racked.com/2017/5/5/15409374/tote-bag-history https://www.vogue.co.uk/article/why-we-need-to-rethink-the-term-hobo-bag

https://www.whatgoesaroundnyc.com/editorial/post/the-original-bucket-bag-has-a-unique-history/

https://www.whowhatwear.co.uk/fendi-baguette-new-york-fashion-week-party/slide2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handbag

A History of Handbag Fashion Through the Ages

Ancient Handbag Fashion

Since ancient times, humans have been fashioning bags to carry their personal items. In fact, what is believed to be the world’s oldest handbag was recently discovered in an excavation site in Germany. Dated at around 2,500-2,200BC, the bag features a painstakingly-crafted design of over 100 canine teeth… yes, you read correctly – the ‘It girls’ of the Stone Age adorned their purses with the remains of their furry friends.

Luckily for us, handbag fashion has evolved a lot since then, but you’ve got to admire the dedication.

The next glimpse we have of early handbag fashion comes from the 1300s, and it is gorgeous.

Early 14th century Courtauld Metal Bag (Source: courtauld.ac.uk)

Hailing from Northern Iraq, this 14th-century artefact is not too far removed from the sort of shape and intricacy you’d find in modern exotic bags (such as our Lucy Embroidered Bag!) The brass handbag, understood to have belonged to a noblewoman from the Mongol Empire, features delicate metalwork inlaid with gold and silver designs, and was sure to have made the lucky lady the talk of the town in her day.

But handbags weren’t just for women. Since pockets in clothes didn’t start making an appearance until the 17th century, throughout history men also carried their everyday items (predominantly coins) in purses that were tied to their waists or girdles.

18th Century Handbag Fashion

By the 18th-19th century, handbag fashion had started to emerge, particularly among the ladies of England and France. The ‘reticule’ (or ‘indispensable’ in England) was akin to what we would now recognise as a drawstring bag, and was a soft purse made from leather, silk or velvet that complemented the more slimline clothing fashions of the time. Large, voluminous skirts and petticoats were out, and it would have been a major faux-pas to wear bulky pockets (a whole garment by themselves) with the newly-fashionable high-waistline dresses of the late 18th century.

Due to embroidery becoming a necessary skill for marriage eligibility in young females around this time, ladies were able to create their own patterns and styles to suit their own tastes. Here are just a couple of examples of some exquisite designs from this period:

Early 19th Century French Reticule (Source: metmuseum.org)
1820s British Indispensable (Source: collections.vam.ac.uk)

By the 1840s, when the industrial revolution was in full swing in England, the handbag began to evolve again. We can trace the exact origins of the modern handbag to entrepreneur Samuel Parkinson – on noticing that his wife’s current bag was far too small and flimsy for regular train travel, he commissioned a custom set of durable leather bags and trunks from luggage supplier H. J. Cave. They were happy to oblige, and this travel set included what is now regarded as the very first luxury handbag.

Due to their exclusivity to the upper classes, this style of bag didn’t really catch on until the early 20th century; reticules were still the go-to for most women, who had no need for large, bulky accessories. In fact, the word ‘handbag’ wasn’t used until the beginning of the 1900s, used to describe hand-held luggage bags sported by the first male rail commuters – they were sturdy, practical, and featured various pockets and compartments to hold a variety of everyday items.

Despite the slow start, the travel-friendly designs of H. J. Cave and other high-end luggage brands would later have a huge impact on fashion house founders such as Gucci and Louis Vuitton (we’ll learn more about this in a bit). Their closest contemporary from the late 19th century came in the form of ‘carpet’ or ‘tapestry’ bags, a less-expensive alternative for female travellers across the globe.

1860s American Carpetbag (Source: metmuseum.org)

20th Century Handbag Fashion

While the practical travel bag continued to grow in popularity, in the early 1900s, smaller handbags also saw a significant change from an ‘indispensable’ necessity to a trendy accessory for the modern fashionista. With materials such as metal and glass becoming more widely available, items such as this clasped evening bag were the perfect add-on to any outfit (usually for parties or other social events).

Early 20th Century American or European Evening Bag (Source: metmuseum.org)

Handbags evolved rapidly during this period of wealth and social status, and as bags became more of a fashion statement in their own right, many of the styles we view as modern-day handbags (such as clutches and satchels) were also developed.

While all this was going on, a certain Italian was forgoing the ever-changing trends of the partygoers to cater to the upper classes’ needs – yes, here’s where Guccio Gucci comes in. Taking inspiration from the elaborate suitcases he saw carried by wealthy travellers, he established a fine leather goods store in the 1920s which sold to equestrian elites and other high-status clients.

The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in the 1930s also prompted the rise of ‘Egyptomania’, bringing more exotic, colorful motifs into the wealthy revellers’ wardrobes.

But with the coming of WWII and subsequent material shortages, Gucci had to change tact. And so, the timeless canvas Gucci bag was born. If you look closely at this promotional photo from the 1930s, you can even see the iconic double-G logo:

1930s Gucci Luggage Bag (Source: crfashionbook.com)

Other common materials from this time were plastic and wood, which somewhat limited design flexibility. But this didn’t stop designers from getting creative, turning to more obscure materials such as animal skins. The drawstring bag even made a reoccurrence; something that the frugal wartime woman could easily fashion herself at home from inexpensive or repurposed fabrics.

Style-wise, functionality was king. Satchel and shoulder bags provided an on-the-go, practical look, and bags became squarer to maximise space for the working woman.

Once the war was over, many of the fashions that had been kerbed during this period sprung back into life, and with them came the founding of many of the modern fashion houses that we know today.

At first seen as a controversial and extravagant statement, Dior’s 1947 ‘The New Look’ collection took female fashion, including handbags, into a brand-new era. In a time where the world was only just recovering from the limitations of war, Dior concretely changed the purpose of a handbag from a practical accessory to a status symbol – a fashion that was popular throughout the ‘50s. As tends to be the case in fashion, trends spread quickly, and this decade brought forth some of the most iconic designs that are still widely appreciated today:

We were soon seeing pieces like this from emerging designers such as Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Hermès, to name but a few.

Coco Chanel with the timeless 2.55 Bag (Source: vintagefashionguide.com)
Elizabeth Taylor with the iconic Gucci Bamboo Bag (Source: thecarneliancloak.wordpress.com)
Grace Kelly with her Hermès Kelly Bag (Source: telegraph.co.uk)

Moving into the ‘60s, female fashion saw the resurgence of pockets in their current iteration, providing a lot more freedom and allowing handbags to become even more of a statement icon than a necessity. In line with increased economic freedom within the younger generations, a range of bold colors, fabrics and patterns became widely available at affordable prices for the partygoing early ‘hippie youth’, as well as designer pieces like those in the Paco Rabanne ‘Walborg’ metal disco design, complementing his similarly-styled fashion pieces of the decade like this 1967 ‘space-age’ dress:

Aluminium Micromini Dress, Paco Rabanne, 1967

The metallic trend harkened back to the fashion of the ‘20s, and is such a timeless classic it is still sold today, but interestingly, so did the style of bag – the need to be more portable for social occasions at bars and clubs resulted in a rise in cross-shoulder and box bags. Handbags trends continued to vary as the years went by. The ‘70s saw bigger, more practical bags with zips and pockets aimed at the liberal young woman. As well as decorative fringes, tassles and other ‘boho chic’ features, tapestry-style and exotic pieces not unlike our Embroidered range came into fashion:

Amazon Embroidered Tote, Fricaine
Amazon Embroidered Tote, Fricaine

From the ‘80s onwards, pretty much anything goes. The classic silhouettes, fabrics and styles of earlier decades remained popular for everyday use, such as the Hermès Birkin Bag. Among the raver youth, cross-body bags continued to be in high demand for their practicality from day through to night, but had stiff competition from the ‘fannypack’ (or ‘bumbag’ in the UK), which often featured Neon and Aztec patterns.

Small and cutesy shoulder bags reigned right through the ‘90s, in bold animal prints and quilted designs similar to the Chanel 2.55, and by the time the millennium hit, pretty much every bag imaginable could be spotted somewhere from the runway to the club, or on the shoulder of the working mother heading to the shops! Nowadays, we’re pretty spoilt for choice; we have access to a near-unlimited selection of textiles, styles, colors and patterns, with more becoming available every year to suit any taste or occasion.

In these handbags, and in constantly shifting fashion trends, we see not just how the innovative designs of years gone by have influenced modern culture around the world, but how the accessibility of resources and travel has brought countless cultures together to further develop the ultimate women’s fashion accessory.

Interesting articles read while researching this blog:

https://bagbirdy.com/the-evolution-of-the-bag/

https://bellatory.com/fashion-accessories/FashionHistoryPursesHandbags http://fiveminutehistory.com/the-history-of-handbags-a-5-minute-guide/ https://www.georgettemagazine.com/magazine/the-story-behind-guccis-iconic-bamboo-bag

https://www.harpersbazaar.com/uk/fashion/fashion-news/news/g34837/diors-new-look-revolution/ https://henriettashandbags.com/index.php?main_page=page&id=4 https://www.insider.com/how-handbags-have-changed-2019-1#2000s-bags-were-colorful-and-funky-18

https://www.loveyourleather.ca/leather-blog/history-of-purses/ https://vintagedancer.com/1950s/1950s-handbags-purses-styles/ https://www.vogue.co.uk/gallery/bag-trends-by-the-decade https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guccio_Gucci https://womensmuseum.wordpress.com/2017/05/31/the-history-of-the-handbag/

Benefits of Adding Avocado Oil to Your Skin Care Routine

When we think of avocado, we probably think of it on toast (ideally with a soft-boiled egg and a pinch of chili flakes), in smoothies and in Instagram-approved avocado bowl recipes. What may not immediately spring to mind is avocado in our skin care products.

All the reasons avocados are so healthy for your body apply to the skin as well. The fruit (yes, fruit) is high in vitamins A, B-complex, C and D, magnesium, calcium and many other amazing minerals, according to IdoMagal, founder of Lavido. Plus, avocados contain fatty acids that provide nourishment to dry, flaky skin. Its superfood credentials are why some health enthusiasts slather avocado on their face so the skin can reap the benefits. Those who prefer to save their bags of avocados strictly for eating can still enjoy the skin-perfecting benefits of avocado thanks to the rising number of skin care products formulated with avocado oil.

Amanda Sipenock, Lush brand and product trainer, explains that avocado oil is created by cold-pressing the flesh of the avocado. FYI: It takes 10 fruits to produce 1 teaspoon of the oil. The result is a rich, thick product that absorbs easily into skin. According to Magal, “The fatty acids that are contained within avocado oil have a complex molecular structure and they are extremely nourishing for the skin. It takes the body a long time to process these fatty acids and because of that, they enrich skin with nutrients, help to increase skin elasticity and smooth skin.”

Avocados’ nourishing properties make them well suited for skin care products, but the ingredient can also be found in hair, bath and even makeup products. And you thought we had already reached peak avocado.

Another great thing about avocado oil is that it’s suitable for all skin types. Sipenock points out that avocado oil is generally a more hydrating oil than some of its counterparts but it can still work for those with oily skin. When combined with other ingredients, avocado oil helps hydrate skin without making it greasy.

Freeman Beauty

Feeling Beautiful Avocado & Oatmeal Facial Clay Mask, $4.29 at Ulta The massive avocado on the package is a big clue that this mask is packed with good-for-skin avocado oil. It’s mixed with kaolin clay and oatmeal to purify pores and increase hydration. Use it a few times a week for a deep clean.

Eve Lom

Radiance Face Oil, $80 at Space.NK This facial oil is rich in avocado oil, hemp seed oil and Abyssinian oil, but it also has rice powder to soak up excess grease.The result is a product that instantly absorbs into skin while leaving behind a flattering matte finish. There’s no need to worry about shiny foreheads when using this stuff.

Elemis

Superfood Facial Wash, $25 at Elemis Don’t just start breakfast off with avocados — start your skin care regimen with them. The facial wash is packed with skin care superfoods, including wheatgrass and kale, plus avocado, broccoli seed and pumpkin seed oils. The product is suitable for all skin types and helps boost skin’s natural glow.

Origins

Drink Up Intensive Overnight Mask, $27 at Nordstrom This overnight mask is like a quenching drink for skin. Apply it before bed and the hydrating formula will instantly boost moisture reserves. The next morning, skin will be plump and glowing without any mask residue on your pillow. Most importantly, skin will remain soft and smooth as the day progresses.

There are certain outfit combinations that are "in" every single year. Each spring, we break out our booties, pull out our favorite pairs of jeans, and reunite the dynamic duo you’ve been waiting to wear. But what keeps us coming back to this combination is that how we wear ankle boots with jeans is never the same from season to season. Right now, it’s all about pairing sock boots with relaxed denim, and we have proof.

The cool combination has become an instant favorite among trendsetters like Selena Gomez and Bella Hadid. Where skinny jeans might clash awkwardly with boots that cling so tightly, the wider legs of relaxed jeans ensure that your boots and pants aren’t facing off for attention. Style the dynamic duo with a fitted tank or a casual tee, and once things cool off, throw a coat on top. Winter may still be around for a while, but now you’ve got a go-to outfit to get you through all the chilly days to come.

On Selena Gomez: Frame Le Noveau Jeans ($239); Zoë Jordan coat; Louis Vuitton bag; Roberi& Fraud sunglasses Selena styled her denim and boots with a long plaid coat, perfect for chilly weather.

On Chrissy Teigen: Alexander Wang Denim Jacket ($450); Gucci Printed Cotton-Jersey T-Shirt ($550) and Leather Belt ($420); Balenciaga Stretch-Jersey Sock Boots ($995). A denim jacket gives Chrissy’s look a relaxed vibe.

On Sofia Richie: Stuart Weitzman The Clinger Bootie ($598). Sophia’s white boots are a must.

On Bella Hadid: Esteban Cortazar sweater; Stuart Weitzman Cling Bootie ($575); Alexander Wang fanny pack

Bella’s slouchy jeans feel instantly elevated with sleek boots

We’re Obsessed With These Cute New Bath Bombs

Lush just launched its limited-edition Easter and spring collections, and this new product pretty much guarantees your best bath ever.

If you were looking for an excuse for a little me time, look no further. Lush just launched its limited-edition Easter and spring collections, and now we can’t wait to take a bath. From shower creams to bath bombs to bubble bars, there’s something for everyone you might be shopping for, plus more than a few options you’ll want all for yourself. For the bath, we love the new Which Came First Bath Bombs ($13; lushusa.com). As the name suggests, it’s shaped like an egg and holds a fizzy surprise inside when you crack it open. Available in two different patterns, each contains a blend of grapefruit oil, lemon oil, and sweet vanilla absolute, so it not only fills your tub with a sweet aroma, but it also leaves skin silky soft.

The Bunch of Carrots Reusable Bubble Bar ($9; lushusa.com) is perfect for the kids. The purple, pink, and orange carrots are enough to create three bubbly baths and have a fresh lemon scent. Hold them under running water until you get the desired amount of bubbles, then let it dry out until you use it again.

For an everyday shower treat, try the new Here Comes the Sun shower cream ($10; lushusa.com). It works like a bar of soap, but instead of stripping your skin and leaving you dry, it’s made with shea butter and avocado oil so skin is hydrated and soft afterwards. Plus, since it’s a solid, it lasts twice as long as a typical body wash would. With this bar in your shower, your skin will be soft and hydrated by the time warmer weather hits.

The Surprising Thing Celebs Received in Their Oscar Gift Bag

Even if they didn’t receive an award on Sunday, Academy Award nominees still went home with something fun: an Oscar gift bag worth nearly $100,000. And this year’s haul will include an unexpected food gift: a box of high-end maple syrup. That’s right, maple syrup.

Of course, the syrup isn’t your typical grocery store stuff. The 100% pure organic maple syrup and maple-derived products, made by a company called rouGe, are produced in Qubec, Canada, and are marketed as luxe food gifts geared towards celebrities. The products are offered online only, in three types of packages, though the nominees will receive an Oscar-specific multi-pack valued at $100 (greatly increasing the value of a short stack).

For the rest of us, there’s the Celebrity Gift Set ($125), which includes maple syrup, maple and raspberry dressing, maple and dijon dressing, prepared maple mustard, and Julie’s hard maple candies. The Prestige Gift Set ($125) has maple syrup, three types of maple jelly, maple butter, and the hard candies. The Premium Gift Set ($225) offers both the Celebrity and the Prestige products. All three come with a personalized official certificate of adoption of a maple tree in Quebec.

Other food gifts in the Oscar gift bag include oranges from the delivery app Epifruit, Chocolatines chocolate, Southern Wicked Lemonade Moonshine, Delicacies Candy & Confections organic vegan lollipops, the Danish cookbook Cook Yourself Happy by Carline Fleming, Posh Pretzels gourmet pretzel gift boxes, and Quincy Herbals detox tea. For more products, check out Fortune’s list of the best and most unusual parts of the goodie bags.

How to Wear This Season’s Curly Hair Trend (Even If Yours Is Super Straight)

To all those who have spent countless hours wrestling with dryers, straightening irons and even chemical treatments to get every hair in place: Times are changing. Gone are the days when sleek, bone-straight hair was the ultimate hair goal. This season, soft, tousled curls were all over the runways. Yes, it’s time to toss your straightener and mega-hold gel aside and embrace unstructured, carefree waves and coils.

If you weren’t born with natural ringlets springing out of your head, there’s no need to fret. We asked Dana Tizzio, senior stylist at Butterfly Studio Salon, to give us tips on how to curl your hair, even when yours is super straight.

Sleep Smart

When you’re working with little to no texture in your strands, any styling booster helps. Tizzio recommends setting hair while you sleep to build texture. “Braiding hair in two low braids overnight is a great base for adding more texture,” she says. Simply snooze and wake up to tousled, wavy hair. If you prefer a ringlet-shaped curl, swap your plaits for two low buns. Remember: The tighter you twist your buns (and the more buns you have), the tighter the curl.

Use Hot Tools/

From wands to curling irons to hot rollers, there is a tool to help you achieve your hair goals, especially when trying to add texture. “For a more long-lasting curl, opt for a 1-inch curling iron over a wand,” Tizzio recommends. “If you have naturally straight hair, wands often give results that may be too loose to support fine hair strands.” For a more relaxed curl look, try hot rollers for extra volume and bounce.

Enhance Curls With Product

Once you’ve settled on your method for perfecting your spirals, find a product that will not only enhance the texture but keep curls in place all day long. “Workable hairsprays are best because you can use them before applying heat as well as a finishing spray to keep hair in place,” says Tizzio. If your strands fall limp, try a dry spray or dry shampoo to plump hair density and add thickness and volume. Tizzio likes Shu Uemura Sheer Lacquer ($26.99) and Oribe Thick Dry Finishing Spray ($42).

Better Together: Unexpected Style Pairings That Actually Work

Sneakers and Dresses

Designer sneakers are a major trend and when you’re spending serious cash on footwear, it’s great to know they’re versatile enough to wear from day to night. This trend really took on steam with the Spring 2018 shows and continued into Fall 2018 (notably at Burberry). While it’s easy to look like you’re ready for Halloween in some of the more out-of-the-box sneaker styles, by keeping your dress tailored and avoiding any excess fabric, sneakers and dresses can be both comfortable and stylish.

Sweatshirts and Sequins

Let the good times roll by combining athleisure with glitz and glam. Twinkling looks were all over the Spring 2018 runways and they’re an unexpectedly great trend to work into your wardrobe now. The key is to either commit to looking like a disco ball — as we saw on the Gucci runway — or pick a sequin sweatshirt and let that be the focal piece of your outfit (think sequin sweatshirt with fitted black trousers). 

Sandals and Socks

This is similar to the fanny pack in that this combination was long a serious fashion faux pas. Now, in the right context, it’s totally chic. The key to making the sandals and socks pairing work is to play up the kitschy, fun factor — think glitter!

Black and Blue

The problem with wearing black and blue together is that the two shades look very similar, which may make people wonder whether your pairing is accidental or intentional. Don’t let them question it. To make this pairing work, amp up the contrast by opting for a lighter shade of blue to pair with black. Alternatively, you can work in a brightly contrasting shade like white, gray or silver to play up the slight contrast if you want to opt for a dark blue.

Dress and Pants

Forget tights, the best way to make a dress work even if the temperature is nearing zero is to wear it over pants. The most important thing here is to either go lightweight if you’re opting for a long dress and loose-fitting pants or to go for a minidress paired with fitted pants. These two combinations are best to make sure the look doesn’t end up appearing bulky.

Beauty Products You Should Be Using in Pairs

Some things — peanut butter and jelly, Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen, Mulder and Scully (what?) — just work better in twos. The same can be said of beauty products. Granted, using multiple products at once is hardly a new trick, but certain treatments, when combined, really pack a punch. Be it the way their ingredients invisibly interact to better shield your skin against sun damage or, on a more superficial level, the lewk they achieve when applied in direct succession, the skin care and cosmetics world is full of game-changing duos that should be as ingrained in your neurons as the aforementioned condiments/fashion designers/FBI agents.

Antioxidants + SPF

If you have skin, sunscreen is a nonnegotiable. But to really get the most out of your SPF, you’ll want to team it with a powerful antioxidant like vitamin C, which zaps free radicals and is incredible for brightening skin. Per New York dermatologist Dr. Patricia Wexler: “In serums, [vitamins C and E] have been shown to enhance the function of SPF formulations when used in combination, reducing the incidence of sunburns and increasing the SPF’s stability.” As far as SPF goes, we’re partial to Supergoop’s latest formula, which protects against UVA rays, UVB rays and the infrared and blue light emitted by your electronic devices. Couple it with The Ordinary’s ultra-lightweight, ultra-affordable ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate/vitamin F serum. (Ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate is “an oil-soluble derivative of vitamin C that can be used in higher concentrations without drawbacks”; vitamin F equals essential fatty acids.) Either pat the oil on first or add a few droplets to your daily sunscreen dollop. Supergoop! Unseen Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 40, $32 at Sephora The Ordinary Ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate Solution 20% in Vitamin F, $17.80 at The Ordinary

Moisturizer + Full-Coverage Concealer

For a naturally glowy finish and soft, bouncy skin, combine two cult favorites: Nars’ creamy Soft Matte Complete Concealer and Weleda’s ultra-moisturizing Skin Food. (The concealer-to-lotion ratio depends on the level of coverage you require. Also, don’t let the blend’s rich texture deceive you — it’ll melt right into your skin.) It’s like whipping up your own custom BB cream. NARS Soft Matte Complete Concealer, $30 at Sephora Weleda Skin Food, $9.89 at Target

Matte Lipstick + Setting Powder

When using a highly expensive, highly esteemed lipstick (i.e. one of Pat McGrath’s Best of Beauty award-winning MatteTrance tubes), you want to make it last as long as possible. Enter Laura Mercier’s Translucent Loose Setting Powder. Just as it does to the rest of your makeup, the powder will mattify your lipstick and keep it in place. Here’s what you do: after applying your color, place a single-ply tissue over your lips, then lightly brush the setting powder over the tissue using — what else? — a big, fluffy powder brush. Next, remove the tissue and continue on with your life, unplagued by the nagging desire to check your face in the mirror. Laura Mercier Translucent Loose Setting Powder, $23 at Sephora Pat McGrath Labs MatteTrance Lipstick, $38 at Sephora

Glycolic Acid + Hyaluronic Acid

Those who suffer from acne and dryness, meet your skin super-duo. Kate Somerville’s best-selling cleanser re-texturizes and de-gunks skin using natural fruit enzymes, lactic acid and glycolic acid (the teeniest and most efficacious of the alpha-hydroxy acids, due to its ability to deeply penetrate skin). Follow up with Peter Thomas Roth’s light, airy, water-vapor-trapping cream. Hyaluronic acid, which we’ve written about at length, is a lightweight but heavy-duty moisturizer — each molecule can retain up to 1,000 times its weight in water — found in just about every anti-aging product. It quenches and plumps your skin without adding any oiliness to the equation, which, if you’re pimple-prone, is more than ideal. Neither it nor Peter Thomas Roth can do any wrong. Kate Somerville Exfolikate Cleanser Daily Foaming Wash, $38 at Sephora Peter Thomas Roth Water Drench Hyaluronic Cloud Cream, $52 at Sephora

Move Over Crop Tops, Extra Long Shirts Are the New Must-Have

There was a time in the not-too-distant fashion past when everything was cropped: our tops, jeans and even hair. But now influencers are aiming for Rapunzel locks instead of buzz cuts, cuffed jeans are making way for classic bootcuts and shirts are plunging below our waistlines. Whether it’s a white button-down that goes down almost to your knees or a floor-scraping top worn over pants to replicate that whole dress-over-pants vibe, the longer your top, the better.

Call it a response to the deconstructed shirt trend or all those short dresses/tops with trains on the red carpet (Kendall Jenner FTW), shirts with elongated hems are growing in popularity and were trending at New York Fashion Week Spring 2018. Oscar de la Renta gave us a variety of extra long shirts, either splattered with paint-like splotches or boasting silver streaks. Monse reigned supreme when it came to offering extensions, from an off-the-shoulder red blouse that could double as a dress to a striped cold-shoulder creation that exposed skin in the front, but covered things up in the back. And Brandon Maxwell sent several waterfall-style shirts down his runway with hems so long, they rivaled any trains.

The street style set already embraced longer lengths while attending the Spring 2018 shows. They sported winter floral blouses that went down almost to the knees of their jeans or opted for pajama co-ords with the top reaching way below the waist. And since longer lengths look great poking out the bottom of practically any winter jacket (we’re talking puffers, teddy jackets, etc.), the Fall 2018 showgoers are also favoring shirts that they can still flaunt even when outerwear is closed tight.